Micropatterned Surfaces for Reducing the Risk of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection: An In Vitro Study on the Effect of Sharklet Micropatterned Surfaces to Inhibit Bacterial Colonization and Migration of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (2011)

One of our greatest accomplishments at Sharklet has been our work on urinary tract infections. UTI’s are common in hospitals, causing discomfort for the patient and increased costs for the hospital. A urinary catheter with Sharklet on the surface should help reduce the incidence of these infections and help make the world a better place. Read More

Micro-patterned surfaces for reducing bacterial migration associated with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (2011)

While previous CAUTI studies completed by Sharklet focused on flat samples, this study used cylindrical samples designed to emulate the shape of a Foley catheter. The research showed that Sharklet on the surface of the catheter reduces the amount of bacteria migrating up the catheter and into the body – the cause of CAUTIs. Read More

Evaluating the Feasibility of Reducing Surface Contamination in Healthcare Facilities with Micro-Pattern Films (2011)

In a healthcare setting, micro-patterned films applied to high-touch environmental surfaces would likely experience physical wear and oily residue from hand contact. This study demonstrates that the previously studied Sharklet micro-pattern offers significant bacterial inhibition even after being pre-conditioned by physical wear like fingernail scratches and hand lotion residue. In addition, the recently engineered 10×2 Sharklet micro-pattern offers improved optical clarity and is just as effective in reducing microbial colonization as the 2×2 pattern. The results suggest that the 10×2 pattern could be effective for reducing surface contamination on hand-held devices, monitors, and other screens that could harbor bacteria in a healthcare setting.

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Efficacy of microscopic surface patterning for reducing hospital environmental contamination (2011)

In this six-month hospital study, acrylic film with Sharklet micro-pattern was adhesively mounted onto wall panels  and mounted in six locations in the hospital. Each location also contained smooth control surfaces in an attempt to compare bacterial adhesion between the surfaces. The Sharklet-patterned wall surfaces exhibited over 90% less microbial contamination than the un-modified wall. Additional experiments involving artificial contamination of surfaces also showed the same trends. Read More