Prepublication: Surface texture limits transfer of S. aureus, T4 Bacteriophage, Influenza B virus and Human coronavirus

Spread of pathogens on contaminated surfaces plays a key role in disease transmission. Surface technologies that control pathogen transfer can help control fomite transmission and are of great interest to public health. Here, we report a novel bead transfer method for evaluating fomite transmission in common laboratory settings. We show that this method meets several important criteria for quantitative test methods, including reasonableness, relevancy, resemblance, responsiveness, and repeatability, and therefore may be adaptable for standardization. In addition, this method can be applied to a wide variety of pathogens including bacteria, phage, and human viruses. Using the bead transfer method, we demonstrate that an engineered micropattern limits transfer of Staphylococcus aureus by 97.8% and T4 bacteriophage by 93.0% on silicone surfaces. Furthermore, the micropattern significantly reduces transfer of influenza B virus and human coronavirus on silicone and polypropylene surfaces. Our results highlight the potential of using surface texture as a valuable new strategy in combating infectious diseases.

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Micropatterns Enhance Endothelial Cell Migration Under Flow Conditions

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality among adults in the US. As a result, nearly 600,000 coronary and peripheral vascular bypass graft surgeries are performed in the US each year. To overcome limitations of current gold-standard auto-grafting and synthetic grafting methods, Sharklet Technologies, Inc. (STI) proposes a tissue engineered vascular graft comprised of a Sharklet micropatterned acellular extracellular matrix to enhance graft incorporation via guided endothelial cell migration onto the graft lumen.

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Evaluation of a bilayered, micropatterned hydrogel dressing for full-thickness wound healing

Nearly 12 million wounds are treated in emergency departments throughout the United States every year. The limitations of current treatments for complex, full-thickness wounds are the driving force for the development of new wound treatment devices that result in faster healing of both dermal and epidermal tissue. Here, a bilayered, biodegradable hydrogel dressing that uses microarchitecture to guide two key steps in the proliferative phase of wound healing, re-epithelialization, and revascularization, was evaluated in vitro in a cell migration assay and in vivo in a bipedicle ischemic rat wound model.
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Micropatterned Protective Membranes Inhibit Lens Epithelial Cell Migration in Posterior Capsule Opacification Model (2015)

During development of the ClearSight IOL, Sharklet researched the effect that micropatterned surfaces have on epithelial cells. After surgery to remove cataracts, an intraocular lens is inserted into the eye. Epithelial cells migrate onto the new lens, resulting in posterior capsule opacification (PCO). A followup surgery uses a laser to remove these migrated cells. The ClearSight IOL would feature a protective ring of Sharklet to prevent the cellular migration and negate the need for the laser procedure. Read More

Surface Micropattern Resists Bacterial Contamination Transferred by Healthcare Practitioners (2014)

Sharklet-patterned adhesive films are designed to be deployed in many environments, including hospitals. This study places Sharklet film in key areas of a simulated hospital room and measured transference between stations.

Environmental contamination contributes to an estimated 20-40% of all hospital acquired infections (HAI). Infection control practices continue to improve, but multipronged approaches are necessary to fully combat the diversity of nosocomial pathogens and emerging multidrug resistant organisms. The Sharklet™ micropattern, inspired from the microtopography of shark skin, was recently shown to significantly reduce surface contamination but has not been evaluated in a clinical setting. The focus of this study was the transfer of bacteria onto micropatterned surfaces compared to unpatterned surfaces in a clinical simulation environment involving healthcare practitioners.
You can find the full paper below.

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